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Leveraging Breaking News: The Journey, Episode 18

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The Journey, a Social Media Examiner production, is an episodic video documentary that shows you what really happens inside a growing business.

Watch The Journey: Episode 18

The Journey, a Social Media Examiner production. Mike is on a mission to grow his company's customer base by more than 62%, year over year. Watch as he inspires and mobilizes his marketing team to take action.

The Journey, a Social Media Examiner production.

Episode 18 of The Journey follows Michael Stelzner, founder of Social Media Examiner, as he continues to pursue what many will see as an impossible goal: to grow his company’s customer base by more than 62% year over year.

In this episode, Mike wrestles with capitalizing on breaking news and being of service to his community.

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Don’t miss an episode! Subscribe to The Journey on YouTube.

How to Easily Create Videos From Blog Posts

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This post was originally published on this site

social media how toWant to add more video to your content mix?

Have you considered repurposing your blog content into video?

There’s no need to spend hours recording video with an expensive camera when you have existing content and access to free tools.

In this article, you’ll learn how to use free tools to turn blog posts into videos you can share on social media.

How to Easily Create Videos From Blog Posts by Syed Balkhi on Social Media Examiner.

How to Easily Create Videos From Blog Posts by Syed Balkhi on Social Media Examiner.

#1: Outline Your Storyboard

You can turn a blog post into a video pretty easily by building a slideshow presentation that communicates key ideas and converting that slideshow into a video file. To start creating the presentation, browse your blog for an evergreen post that offers useful information and transform that blog post into the text for your video.

Find the key points of your blog post and copy them over to a text file. Then shorten your copy so that each slide has no more than 10 to 15 words. Your audience will have only 4 seconds per slide to take in your ideas, and viewers won’t want to pause the video to read them.

#2: Select Free Images to Enhance Your Slides

You’ll also need beautiful photos and clip art to use in your slides. You can find royalty-free photos from sites such as Unsplash, Pexels, and Stock Up. Many photos from these sources have a Creative Commons license. However, each of these sites has its own terms of use, and individual images may have different licensing policies. Be sure to read the fine print before you include a photo in your video.

Also, when you use an image under a Creative Commons license, it’s good practice to credit the photographer and source for your photo. You can add these to a final credits slide in your video and link back to the photographer’s and source’s websites in the YouTube video description.

Unsplash stock photo search

#3: Build a Slideshow in Google Slides

After you gather all of the source content for your video, it’s time to create the presentation. The details in this article are based on Google Slides because it’s free and works on many operating systems. However, you can adapt the ideas in this article to PowerPoint or Keynote if you prefer.

First, create a new Google Slides presentation. From your home in Google Drive, simply click New and select Google Slides. If you want to use a theme or have a presentation template designed for your brand, apply that theme before you start. (You can apply the theme after you begin creating slides, but you can end up doing extra work to make the slides’ content fit the new theme.)

You’ll find a few themes within Google Slides, as well as from third parties online. To choose a preset theme or import a theme, click the Theme option in the toolbar and a window for browsing and importing themes appears.

Google Slides select theme

If the more highly designed themes are too busy, an alternative is to select a simple theme and then customize your slide background color and possibly the text with colors that reflect your brand. Just make sure you choose colors that have great contrast so your text is easy to read.

Next, you can start creating individual slides and adding text from your storyboard. To begin, create a title slide that reflects the title of your blog post. Your theme may offer one or more title slide layouts, which are usually a great place to begin. Click Layout from the Google Slides toolbar and select a layout that looks like a good starting point.

Google Slides select layout

Copy and paste text from your storyboard into the slides. When you have a great image to go with your slides, click the Image icon to upload the file from your hard drive. Remember that choosing from the preset slide layouts that come with your theme is the easiest way to create a professional-looking result. As you build slides, you’ll start to see your video come together.

Google Slides build presentation

Tip: You may be familiar with scene transitions, animations, and other effects built into presentation programs, and Google Slides is no exception. However, after you convert your slideshow into a video file, none of those animations are preserved. (Microsoft PowerPoint is an exception, as explained a little later.) Instead, you can build simple animations by duplicating slides and then adding to or moving items so they appear animated as the video plays.

For example, say you want two ideas to appear on the same slide, one after the other in your video. This would not only add a nice effect, but also give viewers more time to digest the ideas. First, create copies of your slide by selecting it. Then click the Slide menu and choose Duplicate Slide.

This text animation started with four slides (one original and three copies). To create the animation, you can simply delete text from the first, second, and third slides so the text appears on-screen in 4-second increments, building up to your final point in 16 seconds.

Google Slides create animation

When you’re done creating the slideshow in Google Slides, click File in the menu bar and select the Download As option. From the submenu, choose either Microsoft PowerPoint (pptx) or ODP Document (.odp). Google Slides converts your presentation into the selected file format and then your presentation downloads to your computer.

#4: Convert Your Slideshow to a Video File With Online Convert

To turn your presentation file into a video, you can use a free online service like Online Convert. On the home page, select Convert to MP4 from the Video Converter drop-down list, and you’ll see the MP4 converter.

After you upload your presentation file, select YouTube as the video preset, leave the other options at their defaults, and click the Convert File button. When the site is done converting your file into an MP4, the video file downloads automatically to your computer.

Online Convert app create MP4 file

#5: Add Music to Your Video

If you want to add a music track to your video, you’ll need video editing software. HitFilm Express is a great free option for both Windows and Mac users. iMovie is excellent free video editing software that comes with macOS.

The simplest way to add audio is to add royalty-free background music to the video file. Both Bensound and HookSounds are good places to start looking for audio that works well with your content. After you have an audio file that you like, open your video editor and combine the audio and video files.

In HitFilm Express, you begin by importing both the video and audio into your Media library, which is a tab in the lower left of the Edit screen.

HitFilm Express import files to media library

After you select the audio file on the Media tab, you can trim the audio file to the length of your video in the Trimmer. You find the Trimmer in the upper left of the Editor. The time noted in the trimmer indicates the length of your selected media and will help you match the length of the two files.

To set an in point, which indicates where your audio starts, move the Trimmer playhead to the desired position and then click the Set In Point icon. You set an out point in the same way, using the Set Out Point icon. You then use the Trimmer’s Insert Clip icon to add the trimmed audio to the timeline.

HitFilm Express set in and out point

Lastly, use the Trimmer’s Insert Clip icon to add the video file to the timeline, too. Then you can drag the two clips so that they line up, as shown below. Preview the timeline so you can see how the audio and video play together. When you like the result, export the file to create an MP4 file optimized for the web.

HitFilm Express timeline

Exporting a Video Directly From PowerPoint

PowerPoint contains an option to convert your slideshow into a movie. Because this converter is within PowerPoint, it preserves your transitions and animations. PowerPoint also allows you to add audio narration, and the movie export option preserves those recordings as well.

To export your slideshow as a movie from PowerPoint, click File in the menu bar and select Export from the drop-down menu. Then choose the Create a Video option. For a quality option, select Internet Quality. If you added recordings, select the option to include recordings and narration. (You can preview how the whole slideshow plays before you export the movie.)

When you’re done, click Create Video. It’s as simple as that.

PowerPoint create video options

#6: Upload Your Video to Social Media

Your video is now ready. All that’s left for you to do is upload the video to your social media profiles, especially YouTube, Facebook, and LinkedIn. You can then integrate the video into your social media marketing campaigns to build brand awareness and drive conversions.

On Facebook, you can even pay a few bucks to boost your video to reach a wider audience and get more views.

Conclusion

As video continues to be a major contender in social media marketing, you need an easy and inexpensive way to create videos. Starting from a blog post gives you the source content you need, and the free tools outlined here allow you to create simple but professional videos that represent your brand well.

What do you think? Have you used any of the tools and techniques to create a video? How did they work for you? Please share your thoughts and videos you’ve created using this guide in the comments.

Learn how to use free tools to repurpose blog posts into videos you can share on social media.

How to Easily Create Videos From Blog Posts

0

Want to add more video to your content mix? Have you considered repurposing your blog content into video? There’s no need to spend hours recording video with an expensive camera when you have existing content and access to free tools. In this article, you’ll learn how to use free tools to turn blog posts into […]

This post How to Easily Create Videos From Blog Posts first appeared on .
– Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

How to Easily Create Videos From Blog Posts

0

Want to add more video to your content mix? Have you considered repurposing your blog content into video? There’s no need to spend hours recording video with an expensive camera when you have existing content and access to free tools. In this article, you’ll learn how to use free tools to turn blog posts into […]

This post How to Easily Create Videos From Blog Posts first appeared on .
– Your Guide to the Social Media Jungle

In a World of Diminishing Trust, Data-Driven Marketers Can Turn the Tide

0
This post was originally published on this site

Trusting Hands

My first encounter with marketing data malpractice came at a young age. I wasn’t old enough to understand what was going on at the time, but my dad loves to tell the story. As I’ve gotten older, the humor and timeless relevance of this anecdote have struck me more and more.

It was the mid-90s. We received a piece of mail at our house addressed to Lucy Nelson. It was a credit card offer from one of the industry’s heavy hitters. Nothing out of the norm so far, right?

Here’s the problem: Lucy was no longer alive.

And the bigger problem: Lucy was not a human. She was our dog.

As it turns out, my older brother had been cited by an officer at a nearby park many years earlier for walking Lucy without a leash. When asked to give a name, he stuttered out the Golden Retriever’s, along with our family surname. Somehow “Lucy Nelson” ended up in a city database and the credit card company had plucked it out to add to its mailing list. Ultimately, this resulted in our dearly departed dog being pitched a deluxe platinum card.

Woof.

Flash-forward 20-some years. It’s a different world now. The rudimentary practice of collecting names and addresses from public databases seems so quaint in the Age of Big Data. Businesses and institutions now have the ability to gather comprehensive insights about people, both in aggregate and at an individual level.

For the general populace, this can feel unnerving. And unfortunately, almost everyone reading this has experienced some breach of trust when it comes to corporations or government and personal data.

But for marketers, the sheer volume of information now readily available presents a significant opportunity to take our profession to all new heights. By getting it right, we can help stem the tide of rising consumer wariness.

A World of Distrust

In 2017, for the first time since being introduced almost two decades ago, the Edelman Trust Barometer found a decline in consumer trust toward business, media, government, and NGOs to “do what is right.” That’s bad. And even worse: the organization’s Trust Index didn’t rebound in the 2018 study, released in January.

2018 Edelman Trust Barometer

“A World of Distrust,” Edelman has dubbed it in 2018. And who can blame folks for losing faith? These days it can feel like the only major news story that isn’t shrouded in doubt is when Equifax leaks the personal information of 150 million people.

In such an environment, it’s hard to not to squirm when learning that your Amazon Alexa, and even your smartphone, is listening to you pretty much at all times.

While apprehension is understandable, these aren’t people spying on us; they are robotic algorithms collecting data in efforts to understand us and better serve us.

As marketers, we can play a major role in showing people the benefits of a data-focused marketplace. Customers rightfully have high expectations of our ability to offer high-quality tailored experiences, and we need to follow through. It’s an historic opportunity.

As marketers, we can play a major role in showing people the benefits of a data-focused marketplace. – @NickNelsonMN #CX #DataDrivenMarketing Click To Tweet

Connecting the Dots

Our CEO Lee Odden recently wrote this in a blog about data creating better customer experiences: “One of the universal truths that we’ve operated under at TopRank Marketing,” he explained. “Is about the power of information specific to customers that are actively searching for solutions.”

In that post, Lee wrote about his experience searching online for a portable battery charger and then being served ads for purple mattresses. That’s the kind of thing that drives me crazy. As Lee notes: “The data is there. Customers are telling you what they want. The question is, how to connect those dots of data to understand and optimize customer experiences?”

The consequences of missing the mark are very real. A few years ago LoyaltyOne conducted a survey of 2,000 U.S. and Canadian customers on the subjects of data collection and privacy. Among the findings: only 35% were accepting of retailers using cookies to track their online behavior and just 27% were cool with location-based offers.

How much less widespread resistance might we be seeing against these tactics if they were being utilized more effectively?  

The data is there. Customers are telling you what they want. The question is, how to connect those dots of data to understand & optimize customer experiences? – @leeodden #CX #DataDrivenMarketing Click To Tweet

The Data-Driven Marketer’s Imperative

The stakes are high. We need to piece the puzzle together correctly. If marketers and advertisers can start consistently delivering the sort of customized content and recommendations that data empower us to provide, it’ll go a long way toward restoring customer faith.

We should be using this information to optimize, not traumatize!

Among the biggest areas for improvement I can see, from the perspective of both a marketer and customer:

  • Cut down on data fragmentation and organizational silos. This issue is abundantly common and extremely damaging. The “garbage in, garbage out” adage will never cease to be true. Make the necessary investments to unify your data and enhance the customer journey from attract to engage to convert and every step in between.
  • Be more transparent. Location-based tracking and other oft-used practices would be much less irksome if they didn’t feel so sneaky. Inform customers when you’re gathering info and why. Commit to opt-in policies wherever possible.
  • Follow the principles of the “virtuous cycle.” LoyaltyOne CEO Bryan Pearson suggests that building trust is tantamount to developing face-to-face relationships. “In the beginning, we share a little. Then, once we show that we can be responsible with what the customer has shared, he or she will reveal a little more. And gradually the relationship deepens. This crawl-walk-run approach to sharing information is a sensible way for us to proceed in data collection and use. After all, as long as customer information is used to enhance the customer experience, taking small steps along the way can lead to big things.”

Data has come a long way since the days of sending credit card offers to dead dogs. Marketers, let’s make sure every campaign we create is reflecting this progress.

We should be using the data & information we have to optimize, not traumatize. – @NickNelsonMN #DataDrivenMarketing #CX Click To Tweet

How can you build more trust with your audience? A more thoughtful approach to content marketing can help. Learn several ways to build credibility and trust with content.

In a World of Diminishing Trust, Data-Driven Marketers Can Turn the Tide

0

Trusting Hands

My first encounter with marketing data malpractice came at a young age. I wasn’t old enough to understand what was going on at the time, but my dad loves to tell the story. As I’ve gotten older, the humor and timeless relevance of this anecdote have struck me more and more.

It was the mid-90s. We received a piece of mail at our house addressed to Lucy Nelson. It was a credit card offer from one of the industry’s heavy hitters. Nothing out of the norm so far, right?

Here’s the problem: Lucy was no longer alive.

And the bigger problem: Lucy was not a human. She was our dog.

As it turns out, my older brother had been cited by an officer at a nearby park many years earlier for walking Lucy without a leash. When asked to give a name, he stuttered out the Golden Retriever’s, along with our family surname. Somehow “Lucy Nelson” ended up in a city database and the credit card company had plucked it out to add to its mailing list. Ultimately, this resulted in our dearly departed dog being pitched a deluxe platinum card.

Woof.

Flash-forward 20-some years. It’s a different world now. The rudimentary practice of collecting names and addresses from public databases seems so quaint in the Age of Big Data. Businesses and institutions now have the ability to gather comprehensive insights about people, both in aggregate and at an individual level.

For the general populace, this can feel unnerving. And unfortunately, almost everyone reading this has experienced some breach of trust when it comes to corporations or government and personal data.

But for marketers, the sheer volume of information now readily available presents a significant opportunity to take our profession to all new heights. By getting it right, we can help stem the tide of rising consumer wariness.

A World of Distrust

In 2017, for the first time since being introduced almost two decades ago, the Edelman Trust Barometer found a decline in consumer trust toward business, media, government, and NGOs to “do what is right.” That’s bad. And even worse: the organization’s Trust Index didn’t rebound in the 2018 study, released in January.

2018 Edelman Trust Barometer

“A World of Distrust,” Edelman has dubbed it in 2018. And who can blame folks for losing faith? These days it can feel like the only major news story that isn’t shrouded in doubt is when Equifax leaks the personal information of 150 million people.

In such an environment, it’s hard to not to squirm when learning that your Amazon Alexa, and even your smartphone, is listening to you pretty much at all times.

While apprehension is understandable, these aren’t people spying on us; they are robotic algorithms collecting data in efforts to understand us and better serve us.

As marketers, we can play a major role in showing people the benefits of a data-focused marketplace. Customers rightfully have high expectations of our ability to offer high-quality tailored experiences, and we need to follow through. It’s an historic opportunity.

As marketers, we can play a major role in showing people the benefits of a data-focused marketplace. – @NickNelsonMN #CX #DataDrivenMarketing Click To Tweet

Connecting the Dots

Our CEO Lee Odden recently wrote this in a blog about data creating better customer experiences: “One of the universal truths that we’ve operated under at TopRank Marketing,” he explained. “Is about the power of information specific to customers that are actively searching for solutions.”

In that post, Lee wrote about his experience searching online for a portable battery charger and then being served ads for purple mattresses. That’s the kind of thing that drives me crazy. As Lee notes: “The data is there. Customers are telling you what they want. The question is, how to connect those dots of data to understand and optimize customer experiences?”

The consequences of missing the mark are very real. A few years ago LoyaltyOne conducted a survey of 2,000 U.S. and Canadian customers on the subjects of data collection and privacy. Among the findings: only 35% were accepting of retailers using cookies to track their online behavior and just 27% were cool with location-based offers.

How much less widespread resistance might we be seeing against these tactics if they were being utilized more effectively?  

The data is there. Customers are telling you what they want. The question is, how to connect those dots of data to understand & optimize customer experiences? – @leeodden #CX #DataDrivenMarketing Click To Tweet

The Data-Driven Marketer’s Imperative

The stakes are high. We need to piece the puzzle together correctly. If marketers and advertisers can start consistently delivering the sort of customized content and recommendations that data empower us to provide, it’ll go a long way toward restoring customer faith.

We should be using this information to optimize, not traumatize!

Among the biggest areas for improvement I can see, from the perspective of both a marketer and customer:

  • Cut down on data fragmentation and organizational silos. This issue is abundantly common and extremely damaging. The “garbage in, garbage out” adage will never cease to be true. Make the necessary investments to unify your data and enhance the customer journey from attract to engage to convert and every step in between.
  • Be more transparent. Location-based tracking and other oft-used practices would be much less irksome if they didn’t feel so sneaky. Inform customers when you’re gathering info and why. Commit to opt-in policies wherever possible.
  • Follow the principles of the “virtuous cycle.” LoyaltyOne CEO Bryan Pearson suggests that building trust is tantamount to developing face-to-face relationships. “In the beginning, we share a little. Then, once we show that we can be responsible with what the customer has shared, he or she will reveal a little more. And gradually the relationship deepens. This crawl-walk-run approach to sharing information is a sensible way for us to proceed in data collection and use. After all, as long as customer information is used to enhance the customer experience, taking small steps along the way can lead to big things.”

Data has come a long way since the days of sending credit card offers to dead dogs. Marketers, let’s make sure every campaign we create is reflecting this progress.

We should be using the data & information we have to optimize, not traumatize. – @NickNelsonMN #DataDrivenMarketing #CX Click To Tweet

How can you build more trust with your audience? A more thoughtful approach to content marketing can help. Learn several ways to build credibility and trust with content.

4 Ways to Use Instagram Insights to Improve Your Marketing

0
This post was originally published on this site

social media how toDo you have an Instagram business account?

Wondering how to analyze your Instagram activities?

In this article, you’ll discover how to use Instagram Insights to evaluate your followers, posts, stories, and promotions.

4 Ways to Use Instagram Insights to Improve Your Marketing by Victoria Wright on Social Media Examiner.

4 Ways to Use Instagram Insights to Improve Your Marketing by Victoria Wright on Social Media Examiner.

What Is Instagram Insights?

Instagram Insights is a native analytics tool that provides data on follower demographics and actions, as well as your content. This information makes it easy to compare content, measure campaigns, and see how individual posts are performing.

To access Instagram Insights, you need a business account. If you convert a personal account to a business account, you’ll see Insights for any content that’s posted after you make the switch. If at any point you switch your business account back to a personal one, you’ll lose all of your Insights data.

You can find Insights data in three different places in the Instagram app. To access Insights from your account page, tap the bar graph icon in the upper-right corner of the screen.

Instagram Insights access from profile

To see analytics for an individual post, navigate to the post and tap View Insights in the bottom-left corner.

Instagram Insights access from post

To see data for a story, open the story and tap the names in the bottom-left corner.

Instagram Insights access from story

The Insights homepage shows a summary of data for the content you’ve posted in the last 7 days. In the top section, find out how many total followers you have and how many you’ve gained in the past 7 days.

You can also view how many total posts you have on your account and how many you’ve added in the previous week.

Instagram Insights overview

Scroll down to see a series of bar graphs that reveal the total impressions, reach, and profile views for the past 7 days. Swipe to view website clicks and call-to-action button clicks (Call, Email, Directions).

Instagram Insights impressions

Now that you know how to access Instagram Insights, here’s how to find the data that matters to your business.

#1: Explore Follower Demographics and Behavior

On the Insights homepage, scroll down to the Followers section to see a summary of follower demographics including gender, age group, and location. Note that you need at least 100 followers to see demographic data.

Instagram Insights followers demographics

Tap See More to open a page with graphs that break down follower demographics in more detail. You can segment follower data by:

  • Gender
  • Age range
  • Top locations (cities and countries)
  • Online times (hours and days)

This information helps you better understand who your followers are and where they’re from so you can assess whether you’re reaching your target audience on the platform.

In addition, these insights can inform your Instagram ad targeting. For example, if you want to reach an audience similar to your followers, target the demographics of your current audience.

At the bottom of the Followers section, you’ll find two graphs that show when your followers are most active on the network. In the first graph, find out when your followers are online each day.

Instagram Insights followers times hours

Scroll down to the second graph to discover which days your followers are most likely to be online.

Instagram Insights followers days

Look for patterns in the times and days your followers are online so you can post content at times that will maximize reach and engagement. Additionally, create a posting schedule that best reflects when your audience is online.

#2: View Data for Posts

Instagram lets you view data for multiple posts at once or delve into metrics for an individual post.

Filter Post Data by Content Type, Metric, and Timeframe

The Posts section of the Insights homepage shows your three most recent posts. Tap See More to view additional posts.

Instagram Insights posts See More

By default, the Posts section shows the total number of impressions for all of your posts in the past year.

Instagram Insights posts sorted by impressions

To segment this data, tap any of the blue links at the top of the page and choose from these filters:

  • Content type (all, photos, videos, and carousel posts)
  • Measurement (comments, engagement, impressions, likes, reach, and saved)
  • Time (7 days, 30 days, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years)

Instagram Insights posts filters

The filters let you zero in on relevant data to measure goals, campaigns, and best-performing content.

Goals you can measure for a particular time period include:

  • Engagement (comments and/or likes)
  • Impressions and reach
  • Ratio of engagement to reach
  • Best- and worst-performing content types (photos, videos, or carousel posts)

To measure campaign goals, filter the data by timeframe and identify the type of content posted. This data can also help you identify successful and unsuccessful posts so you have an idea of what content your audience prefers. For example, you might discover your audience engages more with photos of products with people than simply products alone.

View Metrics for Individual Posts

If you want to see data for an individual post, open the post and then tap View Insights in the bottom-left corner.

Instagram Insights individual post

Drag up to view a variety of metrics for that post. At the top, you find engagement stats (likes, comments, and saves).

In the Actions section, discover what actions users took on your profile after seeing this post. Instagram tracks these actions:

  • Profile Visits – The number of times your profile was viewed
  • Follows – The number of accounts that started following you
  • Website Clicks – The number of clicks to links you’ve included in your business profile description

Instagram Insights post Actions

The first stat in the Discovery section is the percentage of people who found your post and weren’t following you.

Below that, you see reach and impressions for the post. You’ll also find a breakdown of where those impressions came from:

  • Home – People who saw the post from their feed
  • Search & Explore – People who searched for keywords or saw your post on an Explore feed
  • Profile – People who found your post from your profile page
  • Location – People who viewed your post from a location feed
  • Hashtags – People who discovered your post via a hashtag search
  • Other – Posts shared via direct message, posts that were saved, posts you’re tagged or mentioned in, post notifications where you were tagged or mentioned, and posts that show up on the Following tab in Notifications

Instagram Insights post Discovery

#3: Evaluate Instagram Stories Data

You can access insights for your Instagram stories from the Insights homepage or directly from an individual story post.

View Insights for Multiple Stories

If you access stories data from the Insights homepage, you see all of your stories posts for the past 2 weeks. This view only shows data in the aggregate; you can’t click on individual posts.

By default, Instagram shows impressions data for your stories.

Instagram Insights Stories sorted by impressions

Tap one of the blue links at the top of the page to filter stories data by time (24 hours, 7 days, and 14 days) and action. The actions are:

  • Taps forward
  • Taps back
  • Exits
  • Replies
  • Swipes away

Instagram Insights Stories filters

Analyze this data to find out what stories content is resonating with your audience and what content is causing them to exit or swipe away. Use these insights to inform future stories content.

Note: Currently, Insights doesn’t provide data for Instagram Live content.

View Insights for an Individual Story

To see insights for an individual story, open the story and tap Seen By in the bottom-left corner.

Instagram Insights access from story

From here, you’ll see which users saw the post, total impressions and reach, and what actions were taken on the post. The actions include replies, swipes away, and clicks on stickers and tagged accounts.

#4: Examine Paid Promotions Data

You’ll find the Promotions section at the bottom of the Insights homepage. Here you can create an Instagram promotion and view active promotions.

Instagram Insights Promotions

Click See More to view a list of previous promotions. Tap a promotion to see the following metrics:

  • Visits to profile
  • Number of people who viewed the promotion
  • Number of impressions
  • Number of engagements
  • Audience demographics
  • Amount of money spent

Instagram Insights individual promotion

This data gives you a quick summary of impressions vs. engagement and clicks to profile on a promotion. You can also view a breakdown of the audience that viewed this promotion by gender, age range, and location.

Conclusion

Instagram Insights is a free tool for analyzing your content without ever leaving the app. The data you find helps you learn more about your audience, what content is engaging them, and how your ads are performing. Use this valuable information to guide the type of content you create for your audience and when you publish it.

What do you think? Do you use Instagram Insights to assess your marketing efforts? Which metrics do you find most valuable? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

Discover how to use Instagram Insights to evaluate your followers, posts, stories, and promotions.

How to Deal with Fake Negative Reviews on Google

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This post was originally published on this site

Fake reviews are a growing problem for those of us that own small businesses. In the online world, it’s extremely easy to create a new account and leave either a positive or negative review for any business — regardless of whether you’ve ever tried to hire them.

Google has tons of policies for users that leave reviews. But in my experience they’re terrible at automatically catching violations of these policies. At my agency, my team spends time each month carefully monitoring reviews for our clients and their competitors. The good news is that if you’re diligent at tracking them and can make a good enough case for why the reviews are against the guidelines, you can get them removed by contacting Google on Twitter, Facebook, or reporting via the forum.

Recently, my company got hit with three negative reviews, all left in the span of 5 minutes:

Two of the three reviews were ratings without reviews. These are the hardest to get rid of because Google will normally tell you that they don’t violate the guidelines — since there’s no text on them. I instantly knew they weren’t customers because I’m really selective about who I work with and keep my client base small intentionally. I would know if someone that was paying me was unhappy.

The challenge with negative reviews on Google

The challenge is that Google doesn’t know who your customers are, and they won’t accept “this wasn’t a customer” as an acceptable reason to remove a review, since they allow people to use anonymous usernames. In most cases, it’s extremely difficult to prove the identity of someone online.

The other challenge is that a person doesn’t have to be a customer to be eligible to leave a review. They have to have a “customer experience,” which could be anything from trying to call you and getting your voicemail to dropping by your office and just browsing around.

How to respond

When you work hard to build a good, ethical business, it’s always infuriating when a random person has the power to destroy what took you years to build. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t the least bit upset when these reviews came in. Thankfully, I was able to follow the advice I’ve given many people in the last decade, which is to calm down and think about what your future prospects will see when they come across review and the way you respond to it.

Solution: Share your dilemma

I decided to post on Twitter and Facebook about my lovely three negative reviews, and the response I got was overwhelming. People had really great and amusing things to say about my dilemma.

Whoever was behind these three reviews was seeking to harm my business. The irony is that they actually helped me, because I ended up getting three new positive reviews as a result of sharing my experience with people that I knew would rally behind me.

For most businesses, your evangelists might not be on Twitter, but you could post about it on your personal Facebook profile. Any friends that have used your service or patronized your business would likely respond in the same manner. It’s important to note that I never asked anyone to review me when posting this — it was simply the natural response from people that were a fan of my company and what we stand for. If you’re a great company, you’ll have these types of customers and they should be the people you want to share this experience with!

But what about getting the negative reviews removed?

In this case, I was able to get the three reviews removed. However, there have also been several cases where I’ve seen Google refuse to remove them for others. My plan B was to post a response to the reviews offering these “customers” a 100% refund. After all, 100% of zero is still zero — I had nothing to lose. This would also ensure that future prospects see that I’m willing to address people that have a negative experience, since even the best businesses in the world aren’t perfect. As much as I love my 5-star rating average, studies have shown that 4.2–4.5 is actually the ideal average star rating for purchase probability.

Have you had an experience with fake negative reviews on Google? If so, I’d love to hear about it, so please leave a comment.

How to Deal with Fake Negative Reviews on Google

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Fake reviews are a growing problem for those of us that own small businesses. In the online world, it’s extremely easy to create a new account and leave either a positive or negative review for any business — regardless of whether you’ve ever tried to hire them.

Google has tons of policies for users that leave reviews. But in my experience they’re terrible at automatically catching violations of these policies. At my agency, my team spends time each month carefully monitoring reviews for our clients and their competitors. The good news is that if you’re diligent at tracking them and can make a good enough case for why the reviews are against the guidelines, you can get them removed by contacting Google on Twitter, Facebook, or reporting via the forum.

Recently, my company got hit with three negative reviews, all left in the span of 5 minutes:

Two of the three reviews were ratings without reviews. These are the hardest to get rid of because Google will normally tell you that they don’t violate the guidelines — since there’s no text on them. I instantly knew they weren’t customers because I’m really selective about who I work with and keep my client base small intentionally. I would know if someone that was paying me was unhappy.

The challenge with negative reviews on Google

The challenge is that Google doesn’t know who your customers are, and they won’t accept “this wasn’t a customer” as an acceptable reason to remove a review, since they allow people to use anonymous usernames. In most cases, it’s extremely difficult to prove the identity of someone online.

The other challenge is that a person doesn’t have to be a customer to be eligible to leave a review. They have to have a “customer experience,” which could be anything from trying to call you and getting your voicemail to dropping by your office and just browsing around.

How to respond

When you work hard to build a good, ethical business, it’s always infuriating when a random person has the power to destroy what took you years to build. I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t the least bit upset when these reviews came in. Thankfully, I was able to follow the advice I’ve given many people in the last decade, which is to calm down and think about what your future prospects will see when they come across review and the way you respond to it.

Solution: Share your dilemma

I decided to post on Twitter and Facebook about my lovely three negative reviews, and the response I got was overwhelming. People had really great and amusing things to say about my dilemma.

Whoever was behind these three reviews was seeking to harm my business. The irony is that they actually helped me, because I ended up getting three new positive reviews as a result of sharing my experience with people that I knew would rally behind me.

For most businesses, your evangelists might not be on Twitter, but you could post about it on your personal Facebook profile. Any friends that have used your service or patronized your business would likely respond in the same manner. It’s important to note that I never asked anyone to review me when posting this — it was simply the natural response from people that were a fan of my company and what we stand for. If you’re a great company, you’ll have these types of customers and they should be the people you want to share this experience with!

But what about getting the negative reviews removed?

In this case, I was able to get the three reviews removed. However, there have also been several cases where I’ve seen Google refuse to remove them for others. My plan B was to post a response to the reviews offering these “customers” a 100% refund. After all, 100% of zero is still zero — I had nothing to lose. This would also ensure that future prospects see that I’m willing to address people that have a negative experience, since even the best businesses in the world aren’t perfect. As much as I love my 5-star rating average, studies have shown that 4.2–4.5 is actually the ideal average star rating for purchase probability.

Have you had an experience with fake negative reviews on Google? If so, I’d love to hear about it, so please leave a comment.

How to Drive Meaningful Interactions in Facebook Groups

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This post was originally published on this site

social media how toAre you struggling to get visibility on Facebook?

Wondering how a Facebook group could help?

In this article, you’ll learn how to use a Facebook group to foster engagement and drive the meaningful interactions favored by Facebook’s news feed algorithm.

How to Drive Meaningful Interactions in Facebook Groups by Megan O'Neil on Social Media Examiner.

How to Drive Meaningful Interactions in Facebook Groups by Megan O’Neil on Social Media Examiner.

Why Revisit Facebook Groups for Business?

Earlier this month, Mark Zuckerberg outlined the changes to the news feed and a move “from focusing on helping you find relevant content to helping you have more meaningful social interactions.”

How are these “meaningful social interactions” being measured? A Facebook Help Center article dives into the types of posts you may see first when scrolling through your news feed: posts similar to those you’ve interacted with through likes, comments, and shares; person-to-person interactions; and exchanges that reflect time and care.

In an interview with Wired, Facebook’s Head of News Feed Adam Mosseri said that in addition to more comments from friends and family, “There will also be more group content. Group content tends to inspire a lot of conversation. Communities on Facebook are becoming increasingly active and vibrant.”

Facebook marketing expert Mari Smith sheds some light on why Facebook groups are integral to fostering these meaningful interactions. “People love to belong,” says Mari, “especially to a community of like-minded individuals and businesses. They like to have a safe environment where they feel they can open up a bit more, be among the first to hear breaking news, or share fresh ideas with one another.”

People tend to join groups around topics they’re passionate about and subjects they’re interested in, and passion and interest are definitely catalysts for engagement.

Facebook groups categories and suggestions

Here are four tips and tactics to help you start driving meaningful social interactions in your Facebook group.

#1: Screen Prospective Members for Fit

People are much more willing to share their personal thoughts, ideas, and work (and to engage genuinely) when they feel safe. Facebook groups are great places to foster a safe space. To do this, create a closed group; use questions to pre-screen new members; and monitor the discussion to weed out spam, bullying, or other types of posts that aren’t contributing positively to the group experience.

Change Group Privacy Settings

Facebook groups can be open, closed, or secret. An open group is public and anyone can join and immediately see all of the posts and begin engaging. A secret group won’t show up in search and the only way for someone to join is to be personally invited by another group member. A closed group can be discovered through Facebook search, but group admins must approve requests to join.

To set the privacy of your group, click the …More button at the top of your group and select Edit Group Settings. Under Privacy, click Change Privacy Settings.

Facebook group change privacy setting

Note that if your group has 5,000 members, you can only go from open to closed or secret, or closed to secret, to protect the privacy of your members. Making a closed or secret group open to the public wouldn’t be fair to group members.

Ask Screening Questions

Not sure whether someone’s a good fit for your closed group? You can ask potential group members questions before they join to get to know a little more about them and why they’re interested in joining.

Here’s how to set that up. Go to your privacy settings (as discussed above) and find the section for Membership Requests. There, click Ask Questions to add questions to the moderation process.

Facebook group ask pending members questions

Monitor Conversations

Once you’ve admitted people to a closed group, you reserve the right to remove them if they’re not adhering to community guidelines. You can remove people under the Members section of your group. Just click the three dots icon next to the member you want to remove and select Remove User. You can also mute members here or add them as moderators or admins.

If you see an unsavory post, you can remove the post and user directly from the post. If you select this option, you can remove all of the posts from the group member within a specified time frame, as well as automatically decline all membership requests from people added by the member.

Facebook group delete post and remove member

#2: Recognize New Members on a Consistent Basis

You’re the cement that holds the group together and your presence ultimately ensures that the community grows and thrives.

Master photographer and educator Sue Bryce runs a successful and active group for her business, Sue Bryce Education, with more than 47K members. She says, “I’ve worked hard over the last five years to keep a community feeling. I do that by being in the group every day myself.” When Sue can’t be in the group, a team of supporters and administrators helps keep the conversation going.

Welcome New Members

The first step to being present is to let members know who you are and that you’re there to help. One of the best ways to do this is to introduce yourself to new members with a welcome message. This is easy to do.

When you add new members to your group, you’ll see a message on the right side of the main group page that says, “You have X new members this week. Write a post to welcome them.” Click the Write Post button, and Facebook will pre-populate a new post for you with all of the new members tagged.

Facebook group welcome new members

Feel free to publish the post as is or personalize the message to share more pertinent information about your group.

Note that you can only tag 99 new people at a time. If you add more than 99 members in a week, you won’t be able to tag them into the post; however, you can still share a weekly welcome message to let new members know you’re glad to have them.

Pin Valuable Information

Pin important information to the top of the group such as your introduction, rules and guidelines, or posts you don’t want new members to miss. A pinned post will stick to the very top of your group feed, regardless of whether you or other members make posts.

To pin a post that’s been published, click the three dots icon in the upper-right corner of the post and select Pin Post.

Facebook group pin post

Sue Bryce shares an idea for using pinned posts to make sure group members recognize your presence and to encourage engagement. “At the top of the group, I have a pinned ‘ASK SUE’ post where any of the group members can ask me a question directly. As the group got larger, it was the only way to funnel the massive amount of tags and direct questions. The pinned post allows me to engage with everyone and support the feeling of community.”

#3: Diversify Engagement Opportunities

Part of your job as a group admin is to encourage people to engage. To do this, respond to questions, chime in on posts, and share questions or discussion prompts.

If your group is designed to help people learn or build their skills, challenges can be a fun way to get group members to engage. This is something Sue Bryce does regularly in her group. She creates challenges that help the photographers in her group build their businesses. “Every month I focus on setting up a challenge. I teach it, they learn it, they try it, and then they post it for accountability and feedback.”

Regular challenges not only help drive engagement, but they also keep group members coming back to find out what’s new, take part, learn, and grow.

Not sure how to get the ball rolling? Start by inviting already engaged fans, friends, or customers to your group. Get creative in using other marketing channels to drive people to your Facebook group. Link back to your community from relevant blog posts and your main Facebook business page, and even send emails letting customers know they can join your community on Facebook for inspiration, feedback, and advice.

Facebook group promote

Using video can be a nice way to encourage even more engagement in your group. You can use both live and recorded video in groups.

Live Video

In a recent blog post, Facebook’s Adam Mosseri shared that “live videos on average get six times as many interactions as regular videos.” As a result, Facebook Live can be a good way to boost engagement in your groups.

This is something that both Mari Smith and Sue Bryce do regularly. For instance, Sue goes live every Tuesday at noon with a new subject to teach her group. The consistency of this Facebook Live broadcast has led to amazing growth in engagement.

And you can also use Facebook Live as an opportunity to bring the high level of engagement in your groups out into the public on your main Facebook page. For example, you could go live on your main page and share the live stream to your group. Not only is it an effective way to send more engaged customers to your groups, but you also may discover group members among the most engaged commenters.

Facebook group live video example

Native Video

Recorded video is also a nice tool for a couple of reasons. For one, video allows you to showcase yourself more authentically than text alone. Get in front of the camera and introduce yourself and your team to your community.

Video also stands out in the news feed, capturing group members’ attention as they scroll through other content on Facebook. And group engagement will also help boost the position of your videos in the news feed, as Facebook continues to focus more on meaningful social interactions.

#4: Spotlight Individual Members

Remember, Facebook groups are all about community, so don’t make it all about you or your business. While your presence in the group is important, you don’t want it to become overbearing. Community Manager Lucas Killcoyne offers this advice: “It’s tempting to jump in immediately, but the last thing you want to do is end a conversation before it has a chance to get off the ground.”

He goes on to say, “You’re probably the authority on the subject your community members are discussing, but giving them a chance to interact and problem-solve together builds bonds and leads conversations in interesting directions that it would never have otherwise. If a post isn’t getting enough love after a few hours, that’s when I jump in to bump it back to the top of the feed.”

In addition to leaving the time and space for others to contribute, here are a few things you can do to shine the spotlight on group members.

Tag Members in Relevant Conversations

As you get to know your community, you’ll also be able to engage them directly. Tag them in conversations you think they’d be interested in or could contribute to. If you have a group member who’s a real estate appraiser, you might tag them in a conversation around that topic so they can chime in.

tag member in Facebook group comment

Offer Critiques

Mari Smith has also found showcasing group members to be an effective way to drive engagement. She says, “I periodically request volunteers for the ‘hot seat’ where I provide on-the-spot critiques for members’ Facebook pages and websites.”

This “hot seat” concept is nice because it not only spotlights individual members from the community, but also benefits the entire group. Everyone can learn tips and best practices from Mari’s critiques that they can apply to their own website or page. In this way, the community can learn from each other.

Feature Content From Group Members

Speaking of letting the members learn from each other, creating content around unique perspectives, out-of-the-box ideas, and good work shared in the group is another fun way to spotlight group members. Seeing other community members showcased is also an incentive for members to continue to share their own perspectives, ideas, and work.

What types of conversations do you envision happening in your group? What types of things do you expect group members to share? Think of how you might repurpose group conversations to create engaging content to share back to the group.

Create a Facebook Group for Your Business

Creating a Facebook group is simple. Just head over to facebook.com/groups and click Create Group. Then name your group, add some people (you need to add at least one friend to create your group), and select your privacy settings. I recommend that you select Closed Group at this stage.

Facebook create new group

Once you click Create, choose an icon that represents your group. If you don’t find an icon you like, feel free to skip this step. Your group is now created!

At the top of the page, you can upload a cover photo to personalize your group. There are also lots of fun special features for group admins to explore, including Group Insights, post scheduling, member leaderboards, and more.

Your group will be created with your personal Facebook page, but you can easily link it to your business page. Just head over to your Facebook page and select Groups on the left. Then click Link Your Group and click to link your newly created group.

Let the Community Guide You

Finally, it’s important to remember that communities inevitably create themselves. As a result, you’ll have to grow and evolve based on what’s resonating with people and the direction they’re heading on their own.

Of course, you can use challenges, shared topical content, and discussion prompts to guide the general direction and reel folks in if they get off topic. But the ultimate meaningful social interactions will come from the conversations that stem from the passions of the people in your group.

Curious what your community wants more of? Less of? Ask them with a poll! To set up a poll on your Facebook page, click the Poll button in the same place you’d go to share a photo or write a new post. Ask what people want to see, list some ideas to vote on, or even open up the floor for group members to add their own ideas!

What do you think? Are you using Facebook groups for your business? If so, what tactics have you had success with? If not, what type of Facebook group do you envision creating for your business? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

Learn how to use a Facebook group to foster engagement and drive the meaningful interactions favored by Facebook's news feed algorithm.